Yuri Patterson and how his work links to mine

In my crit today with tutor, Illona,  it was suggested that I look at the work of Yuri Patterson. The context within which it was suggested I look at his work was from an aesthetic point of view. My project work Faded Glory where I use quite a lot of technology means lots of wires and micro-controllers and so I was working hard to conceal them within the sculpture. My decision to encase them is out of habit ofdisplaying some of my interactive art in public areas where all electronics need to be hidden least they get tampered with. It was great to be reminded that I don't have to do things the same way all the time. Not knowing where I am going to be showing my work this term I am unsure as to where to position all the electronics anyhow and so I may end up with trailing wires as a result of not knowing where the output plugs are.


In an interview with The Arts Newspaper he states:

Pattison, who is no longer an active member of the collective, makes work about the growing pervasiveness of digital technologies. His work often exists both digitally and physically, and attempts to “poke a hole in this glossy aesthetic [exemplified by] every release of the iPhone—when your own phone has a cracked screen or is not working”.

The fair produced content (in the form of data) that he then used to produce the work. Faded Glory scans the internet for information that then produces the work in the form of an LED coloured matrix to represent the Russian Flag. For more information about this work read the lastest article here.

So, I looked into Yuri's work and in the article review of his work in Frieze it seems this artist also works "with ‘trending’ data and systems of interpretation or control." The data I am working with is only as good as the person interpreting it which is me. I will discuss this in a later post.

Another article in the Guardian - Where have all the art punks gone?  appear to see Yuri as one of art punk hero's.

"For a recent installation, Pattison, who started out as part of the London art collective Lucky PDF, collaborated virtually with a man in Kangding, China, working for a Bitcoin mine (where online currency is generated). Like much of Pattison’s work, the piece had an online counterpart: a website that displayed live data from the international Bitcoin network."
 
 Yuri Pattison’s installation at Google Campus, commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery and Create. Photograph: Manuela Barczewski

Yuri Pattison’s installation at Google Campus, commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery and Create.
Photograph: Manuela Barczewski